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jQuery DataTable: thousands separator option doesn’t work

Here I set as described the data table thousand separator, but it doesn’t work the way I expected.

Can anybody help me?

$('#example').dataTable( {
  "language": {
    "thousands": "'"
  }
} );
table.dataTable thead th {
  border-bottom: 0;
}
table.dataTable tfoot th {
  border-top: 0;
}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<link href="http://cdn.datatables.net/rowreorder/1.0.0/css/rowReorder.dataTables.css" rel="stylesheet"/>
<script src="https://cdn.datatables.net/1.10.9/js/jquery.dataTables.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdn.datatables.net/rowreorder/1.0.0/js/dataTables.rowReorder.js"></script>



<link href="http://cdn.datatables.net/1.10.0/css/jquery.dataTables.css" rel="stylesheet"/>
<script src="http://cdn.datatables.net/plug-ins/1.10.24/sorting/formatted-numbers.js"></script>

<table id="example">
        <thead>
            <tr>
                <th>Seq.</th>
                <th>Name</th>
                <th>Position</th>
                <th>Office</th>
                <th>Start date</th>
                <th>Salary</th>
            </tr>
        </thead>
 
        
        <tbody>
            <tr>
                <td>2</td>
                <td>Tiger Nixon</td>
                <td>System Architect</td>
                <td>Edinburgh</td>
                <td>2011/04/25</td>
                <td>320800</td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>22</td>
                <td>Garrett Winters</td>
                <td>Accountant</td>
                <td>Tokyo</td>
                <td>2011/07/25</td>
                <td>170750</td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>6</td>
                <td>Ashton Cox</td>
                <td>Junior Technical Author</td>
                <td>San Francisco</td>
                <td>2009/01/12</td>
                <td>86000</td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>41</td>
                <td>Cedric Kelly</td>
                <td>Senior Javascript Developer</td>
                <td>Edinburgh</td>
                <td>2012/03/29</td>
                <td>433060</td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>55</td>
                <td>Airi Satou</td>
                <td>Accountant</td>
                <td>Tokyo</td>
                <td>2008/11/28</td>
                <td>162700</td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>21</td>
                <td>Brielle Williamson</td>
                <td>Integration Specialist</td>
                <td>New York</td>
                <td>2012/12/02</td>
                <td>372000</td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>46</td>
                <td>Herrod Chandler</td>
                <td>Sales Assistant</td>
                <td>San Francisco</td>
                <td>2012/08/06</td>
                <td>137500</td>
            </tr>
          
        </tbody>
    </table>

Thanks

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Answer

You can use a column render function to convert your source data from numbers without thousands separators to the format you want.

$(document).ready(function() {

  var table = $('#example').DataTable( {
    "lengthMenu": [ 5, 10, 50, 100 ], // just for testing!
    columnDefs: [
      { 
        targets: [5], 
        render: function ( data, type, row, meta ) {
          return '$' + parseInt(data).toLocaleString('en-US');
        }
      }
    ]
  } );

} );
<head>
  <meta charset="UTF-8">
  <title>Demo</title>
  <script src="https://code.jquery.com/jquery-3.5.1.js"></script>
  <script src="https://cdn.datatables.net/1.10.22/js/jquery.dataTables.js"></script>
  <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="https://cdn.datatables.net/1.10.22/css/jquery.dataTables.css">
  <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="https://datatables.net/media/css/site-examples.css">

</head>

<body>

<div style="margin: 20px;">

    <table id="example" class="display dataTable cell-border" style="width:100%">
        <thead>
            <tr>
                <th>Name</th>
                <th>Position</th>
                <th>Office in Country</th>
                <th>Age</th>
                <th>Start date</th>
                <th>Salary</th>
            </tr>
        </thead>
        <tbody>
            <tr>
                <td>2</td>
                <td>Tiger Nixon</td>
                <td>System Architect</td>
                <td>Edinburgh</td>
                <td>2011/04/25</td>
                <td>320800</td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>22</td>
                <td>Garrett Winters</td>
                <td>Accountant</td>
                <td>Tokyo</td>
                <td>2011/07/25</td>
                <td>170750</td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>6</td>
                <td>Ashton Cox</td>
                <td>Junior Technical Author</td>
                <td>San Francisco</td>
                <td>2009/01/12</td>
                <td>86000</td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>41</td>
                <td>Cedric Kelly</td>
                <td>Senior Javascript Developer</td>
                <td>Edinburgh</td>
                <td>2012/03/29</td>
                <td>433060</td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>55</td>
                <td>Airi Satou</td>
                <td>Accountant</td>
                <td>Tokyo</td>
                <td>2008/11/28</td>
                <td>162700</td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>21</td>
                <td>Brielle Williamson</td>
                <td>Integration Specialist</td>
                <td>New York</td>
                <td>2012/12/02</td>
                <td>372000</td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
                <td>46</td>
                <td>Herrod Chandler</td>
                <td>Sales Assistant</td>
                <td>San Francisco</td>
                <td>2012/08/06</td>
                <td>137500</td>
            </tr>
        </tbody>
    </table>

</div>

</body>

This has the following features:

  1. It will work for every record in the table, not just for those which are displayed on the first page.

  2. It does not require a regular expression such as data.replace(/B(?=(d{3})+(?!d))/g, ","); – and is therefore easier to understand.

  3. It uses JavaScript’s built-in support for number formatting using toLocaleString. This means it is also possible to change the thousands separator by applying a different locale (the language tag). For example, if you replace 'en-US' with fr-FR, then you will get the type of thousands separator used in France, which is a space – so $320 800 instead of $320,800.


The above code assumes the source data is provided as number without a currency symbol:

<td>320800</td>

If the source data already has a currency symbol at the start of the string, for example, like this:

<td>$320800</td>

then you would need to adjust the render function as follows:

render: function ( data, type, row, meta ) {
  return data.substring(0, 1) + parseInt(data.substring(1)).toLocaleString('en-US');
}
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