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What does ||| mean in JavaScript?

I’ve googled this and searched through the JavaScript documentation but I can’t find any mention of this operator: a |ǀ| b

When I try the operator on its own I get an error but when I run the following code it runs perfectly fine:

var a, b = 0; tex = 'u0076u0061r'
var players, score = 0, x, y, z = 1;
function f(s) {
	var t = 0, r = 0;
    var js = 'window';
    while (t == r) {
    	if (t == 1) {
        	r = s.length;
            return false;
        } else {
        	t += 1;
        }  for (var i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
        	r = 20;i+=9000;eval(s); x = 50; y =+ 8;
            z = -20; y = s;
        }
        if (r < 20) {
        	return t + 2;
        }}
	    return true;
	} while (f(tex + ' u01C0='+'0') && score < 900) {
	score = 9000.0001;}eval(y); a = 1; b += a;
	x = 50;{y =+ 8;
}

// testing:
document.writeln(false |ǀ| false); // 0
document.writeln(false |ǀ| true);  // 1
document.writeln(true  |ǀ| false); // 1
document.writeln(true  |ǀ| true);  // 1

Changing the values of a and b would suggest it works like || but I just can’t work out why it works with the previous code, but doesn’t work on its own. Does anyone know whats going on here?

Answer

It’s not an operator. It’s the | operator, twice, with a “Latin letter ‘Dental Click'” character in between. That character is valid in JavaScript identifiers. Thus the expression:

false |ǀ| false

(probably) means the same thing as

false | undefined | false

because there’s no real variable called ǀ. (edit — Actually there probably is, otherwise you’d get a reference error.)

The | (bitwise-OR) operator treats its operands as numbers, and both false and undefined become 0.

That function f() is what’s defining a window property called ǀ.

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